Walking to and from Musée Marmottan

pariswanderings.jpg

I must say that with winter and cold weather, my walking takes me quite a lot to museums and exhibitions since I’m lucky enough to live in a city that provides quite a lot of those.
Now, is it that I’ve seen too many of those, lately? Or is it that I was in a bad exhibition mood on that day?
I had decided to walk to Musée Marmottan, 2,6kms according to my iPhone map, except for the fact that I managed to get lost and probably walk longer 😀

La Seine from Pont Beaugrenelle

View from Pont de Grenelle

It was really freezing cold that day and my steps took me across Pont de Grenelle to the Right Bank of the Seine where Musée Marmottan is.

Musée Marmottan now houses mostly Claude Monet‘s paintings and has a special exhibition at the moment called Monet, l’œil impressionniste. A lot in the exhibition focuses on medical details about Monet’s eyes and how it influenced his art.
Well, I didn’t enjoy it, probably because I’m not all that interested in medical details, or even in Monet, I guess.
I don’t think I had ever seen that many Monet paintings gathered in a same place and am ashamed to admit he is not my favourite painter.
Probably because I am an ignoramus and don’t understand much about painting and art and also because I am more interested in the drawing and the composition than the colours?
Well, I really don’t know but it just didn’t appreciate the place the way some of my friends had.
On the way back, it was even more freezing, but this is what I saw on either side of the bridge

Eiffel tower, seen from Pont Beaugrenelle

The Eiffel Tower, seen from Pont de Beaugrenelle

What I like about rivers is that whenever you cross them, even if the view is always the same, the light never is!

Looking at Front de Seine

Rosy clouds mirrored in Front de Seine building

About the top photo, if you are wondering what that bateau-mouche is doing astride the river, it was taking a U-turn, the way those boats do it.

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15 thoughts on “Walking to and from Musée Marmottan

  1. Stumbled on your blog while “surfing”. Great pics. I’m turning 50 in September, I always wanted to somewhere new (to me) and exciting on the big day so I’m hoping to do it (turn fifty that is!) in Paris:)

  2. LOVELY photos, Claude! Especially Tour Eiffel with the dashes of pink.
    I can see how large quantities of Monet could pall, especially if you enjoy line and composition…he is not really strong on either. You are certainly not an ignoramus when it comes to art, your photos are strong testimony to that! 🙂

  3. For what it’s worth, Monet is not my favourite painter, either. Putting it another way, I wouldn’t cross the road to see a Money exhibition even if it were free.

    Paris is a beautiful city, though, and I think if I had followed your itinerary, I would have enjoyed the walk more than the exhibition. In fact, I am certain of it.

    The Eiffel Tower is of course an icon of Paris but it is not until you go there and see it for yourself that you realize how huge and imposing it is. It has a tendency to pop up wherever you go!

    On a sunny day, we go to the Champ de Mars and simply lie on the grass looking up at the tower, watching the lifts go up like ladybirds climbing up a plant.

  4. Oh a bonus – three photos on a SUNDAY.

    Mean, Moody and Magnificent.

    Can’t say I am enamoured by any artist in particular – but I love some like Monet’s Water lilies, Picasso’s Guernica (I cried when I saw it in Madrid) Was disappointed with Mona Lisa – but in the next room was a painting – don’t know by whom – of the Wedding in Cannan – fell in love with the light and colours – not really interested in religions – but that was something else.

    Think I am part philistine – favourite activity – watching people – they are absolutely fascinating.

  5. I love Monets and get lost in them. And I appreciate the visual changes, because I had cataracts in my 40s (second youngest patient they had ever seen) and went through all those visual changes. I now have better vision than I ever had after cataract surgery.

    Impressionists paintings just sprakle and pop to me. Line and color are nice, but to see an artist’s real personality shine through, that is the thing….

  6. I love Monets and get lost in them. And I appreciate the visual changes, because I had cataracts in my 40s (second youngest patient they had ever seen) and went through all those visual changes. I now have better vision than I ever had after cataract surgery.

    Impressionists paintings just sparkle and pop to me. Line and color are nice, but to see an artist’s real personality shine through, that is the thing….

  7. Gee, interesting art discussion! Actually I appreciate Monet too for light and color, but I could see Claude’s point about line and composition. To each her own! It’s really interesting that Donna’s experience with her eyes affected her perception of Monet…
    That Wedding in Cana painting was in the Louvre, am I right, Mrs. K? I’ll look it up sometime…
    Merry Christmas to all!
    Sara

  8. Yes Sara it was – we had an unexpected stopover in Paris for 24 hours, first and only visit – so breakfast in a cafe somewhere or other – fresh croissant and bowl of milky black coffee to dunk them in then drink the rest. Walk to Louvre and that wonderful painting which I can still see in my mind. Then trip down Seine on Baton Rouge, lunch – walked over bridges – wandered around – then night sleeper to Narbonne. I have never been back to Paris. Not a city person, but love France.

  9. Hi, “What I like about rivers is that whenever you cross them, even if the view is always the same, the light never is!” this is exactly what Monet would have liked in rivers 😉
    I love Monet, and if I were in Paris I’d go to that exhibition because I’m also interested in medicine… but I’m somewhat an exception 😉 Moreover, I’ve already been at the Marmottan and agree with you about the walk to go there: beautiful, but then Paris is so beautiful everywhere…
    I love a lot your photos too 🙂

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